Home » London calling? Higher education, geographical mobility and early-career earnings

London calling? Higher education, geographical mobility and early-career earnings

This report examined the link between higher education, geographical mobility and out-comes for individuals and regions.

First, we examine whether higher education is associated with greater geographical mobility even when we control for confounding factors, such as the fact that graduates tend to be wealthier and have higher educational attainment.

We examine how mobil-ity – and the relationship between higher education and mobility – differs across socio-economic and ethnic groups.

Second, we consider whether graduates do indeed seem to be ‘moving to op-portunity’ by analysing the types of areas graduates move to and from and the earnings gains associated with moving. Third, we consider the effect of mobility patterns on regional inequality.

Higher education is associated with greater geographical mobility.

At age 27, around 35% of graduates and 15% of non-graduates have moved away from the travel to work area (TTWA) where they lived at age 16.

Around two-fifths of the difference in mobility between graduates and non-graduates can be explained by differences in their background characteristics, such as socio-economic status, prior educational attainment and area of origin. All else equal, graduates are 10 percentage points more likely to have moved by age 27 than non-graduates.

Graduates of more selective universities are more mobile, even controlling for background characteristics and subject choice.

Click here to view original web page at ifs.org.uk

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